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Are There Scorpions In Tulsa?

Striped Scorpion

If you are a Tulsa homeowner, you likely already know the answer to the question, “Are there scorpions in Tulsa?”

You’ve seen them inside your home. You’ve seen them scurrying around your property. The truth is that scorpions are actually pretty common in Tulsa, and there’s one species of scorpion that is primary to blame for infesting your home and property.

I’m referring to the Striped Bark scorpion (Centruroides vittatus), and they are the most common and widespread scorpion found in all of Oklahoma. Despite their well-known reputation, there is so much more to this pest than a painful sting.

Here is what you need to know about Tulsa’s Striped Bark scorpion:

Striped Scorpion’s Description

 

Most Striped scorpions are a dark tan color, with almost a hint of orange or even dark gold. These colors do vary from scorpion to scorpion depending on their surroundings and even their age. These scorpions will reach lengths of over 2 ½ inches, and are easily identifiable because of the two distinct stripes they have running down their back. When comparing different scorpion species, Striped Bark scorpions will have longer and more slender tails.

Where To Find Striped Scorpions

 

Like I mentioned before, Striped scorpions are found in Tulsa and throughout Oklahoma. Also prominent in states like Texas and New Mexico, they frequent much of the south central United States.

Outside

Outside, Striped scorpions will shack up underneath any type of cover they can find. They do this because they are looking for protections from the elements and other predators; not to mention that is where they find the insects they love munching on. Watch for them under rocks, boards, and other debris in your yard, and inside the cracks and crevices of stone walls, bricks, stones, and other landscaping features.

Inside

Striped scorpions are nocturnal, so you won’t usually see them wandering around inside your home during the day. During these daylight hours, they’re hiding out in wall voids, attics, or any other hidden location.

Preventing Striped Scorpions In My Tulsa Home

 

Striped Scorpion

Unfortunately, it’s really challenging to find out exactly how many scorpions are infesting your home or property at any given time. The first place to start is with a black light flashlight, searching the entirety of you home at night when the scorpions are active. They are actually pretty easy to spot, as they will glow a bright neon blue when the black light hits them.

If you only find a few, carefully smash them with a shovel or other blunt object. A thick boot works well too. If you are still finding them get professional help.

Call a Tulsa scorpion control professional today!

Tulsa Scorpion Exterminators

 

Bulwark Exterminating
2013 North Willow Avenue
Broken Arrow, OK 74012
(918) 252-3548
bulwarkpestcontrol.com
 
OK Wildlife Control
Tulsa, OK
(918) 739-4382
oklahomawildlifecontrol.com
 
Orkin
6550 East 40th Street
Tulsa, OK 74145
(918) 622-0800
orkin.com
 

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February 10, 2014 - 7:11 PM No Comments

Video- Don’t Share Your Halloween Candy With Roaches

 

This Halloween, instead of sharing your candy with those disease carrying cockroaches, keep it all to yourself. Enlist the services of a cockroach control professional!

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October 29, 2013 - 5:54 PM No Comments

How To Spot A Brown Recluse Infographic

The Brown Recluse spider.

With each word, that line gets more and more terrifying.

The Brown Recluse spider is a staple to Tulsa, right along with Sooner football and fried catfish. Unfortunately, the Brown Recluse isn’t nearly as fun as screaming “boomer sooner” at the TV screen while you’re elbow deep into a bucket of fried catfish.

The Brown Recluse spider has earned its malicious reputation because of the nature of its bites. If you are ever bitten, chances are you won’t even know it until it’s too late. It takes about a week before you’ll experience pain from a Brown Recluse bite. About this time, the infected bite area will be red, with shades of grey and purple. As the wound progresses, the living tissue will begin to decay and die; a symptom known as necrosis. Yikes!

Well, its easy to establish how awful a Brown Recluse bite is, and we know we don’t want them in our homes. What we don’t all know is exactly how to spot one.

The following infographic, is a guide to understanding and spotting Brown Recluse spiders:

How To Spot A Brown Recluse Infographic

 Brown Recluse Infographic

Tulsa Brown Recluse Spider Control

I know it goes without saying, but nobody wants the misfortune of dealing with a Brown Recluse spider bite. Extreme spiders require extreme measures. That is why you need to solicit professional Tulsa Brown Recluse Spider Control if you are frequently seeing these dangerous spiders inside your home. Check the online reviews for pest control companies. These companies happen to be the best in town:

Bulwark Exterminating
2013 North Willow Avenue
Broken Arrow, OK 74012
(918) 252-3548
bulwarkpestcontrol.com
 
OK Wildlife Control
Tulsa, OK
(918) 739-4382
oklahomawildlifecontrol.com
 
Orkin
6550 East 40th Street
Tulsa, OK 74145
(918) 622-0800
orkin.com
 

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October 14, 2013 - 10:23 PM No Comments

Pest Test Word Search Infographic

You may have seen a pest test word search going around Facebook this summer. In it, you are asked to make a comment of the first pest you see, and boy did you respond. Over 10,000 people have commented.

What was the most common pest that was commented?

See for yourself:

Pest Test Word Search Infographic

 

Pest Test Word Search

The following inforgraphic is presented by Bulwark Exterminating.

 

Thomas Ballantyne

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September 12, 2013 - 8:56 PM No Comments

Wasp Ruins My Labor Day

Stinging wasp activity, like that of the pesky yellow jacket, happens to peak during the late summer; and boy did I find out the hard way. I was stung… No, I was attacked!

Wasp Sting

Wasp Ruins My Labor Day

It was a typical Labor Day holiday. Like most Americans, I was spending my holiday outdoors, at a park, with my family. Among the sweet soda and grilling hotdogs, something sinister was lurking.

While enjoying my outdoor Labor Day picnic, I feel this small quiver underneath my blouse. I brush at it, thinking nothing of it at first, when I realize that ‘quiver’ inside my blouse has legs… and a bad temper! It’s a wasp who was flying happily along, and somehow flew inside my blouse, and it definitely does not want to be there. The wasp starts stinging. OUCH!!!

I started running around, frantically screaming! The people around me must have been wondering if I was on bath salts or something. Each time I slap at the wasp, my blouse shakes it loose. The wasp falls a little lower into all-new sections of my body; and the wasp would get mad again, and sting again!

Eventually the wasp made its way out of my clothes; or maybe I just mashed it. Either way, I was in pain. I began to swell up and itch. Needless to say, my fun day was over.

So much for a happy Labor Day!

Wasps

wasp

One of the scariest and most notorious stinging pests is definitely the mighty wasp. There are about 30,000 species of wasps in the world. They all range in color and size. The most common is definitely the yellow and black stinger, but they can also be brown, orange, bright red and metallic blue. Unlike bees, wasps can sting multiple times, but only the female wasp is able to sting.

In nature wasps are some of the most beneficial stingers. Most insects are preyed upon by at least one species of wasps. The adult wasp will eat only nectar, but will hunt out insects to feed to its young and growing larvae. Wasps are even used in the agriculture business as a way of controlling the pest population, because they will only prey on other pests and not cause harm to crops.

Wasps can be either solitary or social. We commonly see solitary wasps on flowers. All solitary wasps are fertile, and after laying an egg have no interaction with their larva. In social wasp colonies, generally, only the queen will be fertile. Nests are built in holes underground, in trees and plants, along riverbanks, and preferable in sunny spots.

Castes systems amongst wasps are not predetermined like in other bees. A female can earn her way to royalty by dominance and behavior. Some become queen, by being able to eat all of the other fertile females’ eggs and some by simply producing the most eggs.

Author Bio 

 is a journalism student and blogger for Bulwark Exterminating, an industry leader in providing high quality pest control services. When I’m not playing with my two adorable nieces, I’m rocking out to the newest One Direction song.

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September 4, 2013 - 9:46 PM Comment (1)

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